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Travel Argentina
Travel Argentina
Travel Argentina with Bob Frassinetti for arts and antiques as well as 4WD travel adventure .... if Traveling is all about meeting people, going through different experiences, enjoying different cultures and discovering foreign and interesting sites. I’ve traveled throughout the south of South America, and I truly believe that a great part of making a memorable experience out of a journey is meeting people, locals specially. Getting to know the site through a local’s point of view is a wonderful experience, off the path outings… following the popular saying: “when in Rome, you do what Romans do”. That’s my leitmotiv when traveling. I also adore my country. I’m a proud Argentinean who has discovered throughout the years the beauty and mysteries of this southern country. Hence I began sharing throughout forums and websites my experiences, tips on what to do when visiting our country. And as I kept on writing about the various customs of our culture I kept on discovering things –little treasures- that I thought were for granted. A great wine, an outstanding site within the city, my own refuge from the craziness of a cosmopolite city, an off the path antique fair… this has been a two way street experience, for at the same time I proudly share the beauties of my land, I have found myself discovering many new and interesting features too. I even have met some great people through these forums, people who came to BA and met with me, with which we’ve had an amazing time and enjoyed a great conversation, a glass of outstanding Argentinean wine. I’ve written about art & antiques, visiting the Patagonia or riding the train up to the Andes through the clouds, shopping and leisure in the city of Tango and of course, about the great pleasure Argentineans take on good eating. I’ve always focused on our most traditional dish, asado, for I’ve thought it was the most perfect way of getting into the Argentinean feel. However I’ve recently discover, that Argentineans –alike many countries within the world who have been built hand in hand thanks to a great flow of immigration, are not all the same. We –as a nation- share our culture and language, but each and every one of us is unique. We each have a particular life’s history that has made us be what we are, and it’s important not to forget about that. To me, that particular part of myself is curry. Yes, food. Yes, Indian food, which I got into when I lived in London and in the British Guyana. My speciality is my Indian-British- Argentinean curry… Hmmm; Indian from origin, British for it’s were I picked it up, and Argentinean for non of these countries have the superb kind of meat we have down here in Argentina and that adds that special something to it. This is my bonding meal, I cook it for my special people. It’s a ceremony which I find most amusing. Not to brag, but it’s the best curry in the country! I won’t say my secret for I’m an artist, and that would spoil the magic… You must come down here and experience it yourself. So if you are interested in anything from Art to Tango or Antiques, and you are thinking of travelling to Argentina Chile or Uruguay please feel free to email me…….. Please feel free to contact Bob Frassinetti: For more information: Email: Bob Frassinetti. Press here to see all topics on Art, Antiques and Travel Information for Buenos Aires & Argentina:Everything on Art, Antiques, Collectibles as well as travel information for Buenos Aires, Argentina, Chile and Uruguay. Phone me thru Skype, ID: Bob_Frassinetti or you can also chat with me thru Yahoo, press here: Yahoo Contact Find me on MySpace and be my friend! Phone: +54 911 6965 1955 or in Argentina (011) 15 6965 1955 Read The Buenos Aires Art Dealer a e-zine magazine on Art, Antiques & Collectibles from Argentina. The Buenos Aires ArtDealer,San telmo Section. Argentina.
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Or Tango and Romance ..
Or Tango and Romance .. 
 
Topic And now Tango Tours Buenos Aires is the city of Tango. There’s no argument on this matter –may be with those who live in Montevideo, Uruguay, who as our brothers in culture share many of our traditions and dances. In these days in which this gorgeous river port side city welcomes visitors from all over the world, sometimes I find myself trying to explain things that have been so naturally always like this all my life. One of these traditions is Tango. Social and sensual par excellence this typical “Portenan” dance and music has been part of my daily life for as long as I can remember, though I never wondered about its way of being… to me it was just there. However in recent months as I began looking deeply into my culture thanks to the constant cultural exchange we are going through. I first discovered –to my deep surprise- that the word tango has an African origin. It has been one of those wicked things to learn about. Why African, especially if the Afro Argentinean population is not so big in Buenos Aires? A bit of history and culture helped me clear this matter up. During the 19th century our country received a huge immigration flow from all over the world, and Africans did came to Argentina, some were slaves, some others former slaves who were looking for a place to begin a new life, and since Buenos Aires was one of the latest cities of Colonial Latin America to develop, and one of the first to be independent from the Spanish. Afro Argentineans worked in the heart of the city, the port side area –today’s San Telmo and La Boca quarters- and had a deep cultural influence: dances –malambo, tango, candombe or barilo (the proper Argentinean version, nowadays pretty much extinguished); food –mondongo, chinchulines, and language –mandinga, etc-. All and all, I wasn’t that convinced that the Argentinean Tango was a translation of an African dance, specially if we consider the fact that there are no similar dances to Tango in any African country. In spite of that, we can trace influences from other dances such as the Candombe – a sexy rhythm moving to the beat of drums- as well as the famous Afro Cuban dance known as Habanera –influencing the languid type of dance. I kept on trying to get to know what till recently was natural and properly ours. After some reading and –many, many- questions to those specialized in the matter I began to tie some loose ends. Tango was –and still is- a popular dance, of the lower classes. At first it was danced among men. Some people say that this dance was the entertainment lower class men had while awaiting their turn in the local cabaret… Strange and funny the hypotheses that have arose around this matter, though none of these was confirmed, and may be they would never will, for popular classes traditions were not documented until recent times and there are not many other sources to turn to. Nonetheless, we do know that the music and dance developed side by side, one depending and being influenced by the other. One other information we have is that during its early years tango music had no lyrics, these were a latter addition to a developed musical base. And thought it was –and still is- a rich rhythm and composition, it was depicted by the educated Argentinean classes even until the early 1902. This only began to change when this new and innovative was welcomed and appreciated in Europe. Tango –as all, dance, music, rhythm, and culture- kept on developing and growing until today and it’ll hopefully will keep it on. This states how much this is a live dance and spirit that evolves and recreates itself. Though during the 70s, 80s and early 90s tango was a bit forgotten, even more to the younger generations, from mid 90s until recently it has regained its place in local culture with renewed power and strength. This statement is crystal clear when one tours around the “milongas portenas” any night of the week. They are packed with young and talented dancers –as well as experienced older ones too- who have learnt how to cross their modern culture with their mother culture… Dressed in eclectic outfits, these many couples –some wearing sneakers, some the proper shoes- twirl around the main dance floor bewitching the inexperienced dancers who admire their talent and Chemistry… those couples we want to emulate when we achieve our first combination of steps. For more information :Email: The Buenos Aires Art Dealer, Bob Frassinetti. Press here to go to the Buenos Aires Art Dealer, San Telmo Section :The Buenos Aires Art Dealer. San Telmo. Press here to go to the Buenos Aires Toy Museum :The Buenos Aires Toy Museum, Argentina. Press here to read Daily updates on Art, Antiques and Collectibles :Everything on Antiques and Art in Argentina, Chile and Uruguay. Bob Frassinetti. Copyright 2005. Updated in 2009, Buenos Aires, Argentina. Roberto Dario Frassinetti.